Personally Connecting to L’cha Dodi

L’cha Dodi “on one foot”:

L’cha Dodi is a prayer in the first part of the Friday evening service (the “Kabbalat Shabbat” part). It follows 6 psalms, representing the 6 days of Creation. It was written in 1529* by Rabbi Shlomo Alkabetz in Tzfat. It is about greeting Shabbat, applying the metaphor of Shabbat as a bride. Many communities sit until the last verse, but some stand throughout it.

*According to Jewish Worship, written by Abraham Millgram in 1971.

Historical Background of L’cha Dodi

רַבִּי חֲנִינָא מִיעֲטֵף וְקָאֵי אַפַּנְיָא דְמַעֲלֵי שַׁבְּתָא, אָמַר: ״בּוֹאוּ וְנֵצֵא לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת הַמַּלְכָּה״. רַבִּי יַנַּאי לָבֵישׁ מָאנֵי מְעַלּוּ (שַׁבָּת) [וּמִיכַּסֵּי], וְאָמַר: ״בּוֹאִי כַלָּה, בּוֹאִי כַלָּה״.

Rabbi Ḥanina would wrap himself in his garment and stand at nightfall on Shabbat eve, and say: Come and we will go out to greet Shabbat the queen. Rabbi Yannai put on his garment on Shabbat eve and said: Enter, O bride. Enter, O bride.

Between 1492 and 1529, Jews were kicked out of Spain, Portugal, Nuremberg, Bavaria, the Papal States, Milan, and Naples. Then in 1520, Suleiman the Magnificent of the Ottoman Empire conquered the Egypt and the Land of Israel from the Mamelukes. This led to a population explosion in Tzfat / Safed as Jews from all over came to this city in the Galilee near Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai’s grave in Meron. Among those who gathered there was the Kabbalist Rabbi Isaac Luria, known as “the Ari”. Around him gathered other Kabbalists, such as Rabbis Joseph Karo (author of the Shulchan Aruch), Elazar Azikri (author of “Yedid Nefesh”), Moshe Cordevero (the leading Kabbalist before Luria), and his brother-in-law Shlomo Alkabetz. They would all go out into the fields at dusk on Friday, singing psalms and songs to welcome Shabbat; this custom spread to other communities but they did it inside the synagogue just before Ma’ariv / Arvit. Inspired by the text in the Babylonian Talmud (Shabbat 119a:2), Alkabetz wrote “L’cha Dodi” as the centerpiece for this new service, “Kabbalat Shabbat” (“Receiving the Sabbath”). He wrote it as an acrostic using his name for the first 8 stances (Shlomo haLevi). Kabbalat Shabbat became the last universally accepted addition to Jewish liturgy.

L’cha Dodi Itself

(יח) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(18) Come, my Beloved Friend, to welcome the bride; let us greet Shabbat as she arrives.

Context: This is the refrain of “L’cha Dodi”, happening at the beginning and then again after each of the 9 verses. The phrase “L’cha dodi” comes from Song of Songs 7:12. The rest of the refrain is based on phrases from Shabbat 119a:2. The idea of the Jewish people being wedded to Shabbat comes from Genesis Rabba 11:8; in this Midrash Rabbi Shimon ben Lakish (a.k.a. Reish Lakish) imagines Shabbat as complaining to G-d that the other 6 days of the week have a partner (1 with 2, or 1 with 4, 3 with 4, or 3 with 6, etc.), but Shabbat has no partner, so G-d promises that the Jewish people will be the partner of Shabbat.

Additionally, the Fourth Commandment says to “Remember Shabbat and keep it holy”, but the word for “keep it holy” (l’kadsho) is similar to the word for the marriage ceremony (Kiddushin), thus reinforcing the idea of Shabbat as the bride of the Jewish people.

The first half of the refrain has 15 letters, while the second half has 11 letters. This is equal to the numeric value of the four letters in G-d’s name: yud, then hey, then vav, and then another hey.

What would it look like if we considered each person at Friday evening services to be a “Beloved Friend”?

(כ) שָׁמוֹר וְזָכוֹר בְּדִבּוּר אֶחָד, הִשְׁמִיעָנוּ אֵל הַמְּיֻחָד, יְהֹוָה אֶחָד וּשְׁמוֹ אֶחָד, לְשֵׁם וּלְתִפְאֶרֶת ולִתְהִלָּה:

(20) “Observe” and “Remember” were uttered as one, we heard it thus from the singular One. God’s name is one and God is one, renown with honor and deserving of praise.

Context: This first verse of L’cha Dodi is based on the conundrum that in the first version of the Ten Commandments it says “Zachor”, “Remember the Sabbath Day”, while in the second version it says “Shamor”, “Observe the Sabbath Day”. Modern scholars chalk that up to 2 different textual traditions, but the rabbis of the Talmud solved it differently. They said that “Zachor” and “Shamor” were said “b’dibur echad”, in one utterance (and in fact, they do sound somewhat similar). That phrase from Shevuot 20b:9 and Rosh Hashanah 27a:2 (and Rashi on Exodus 20:8) became the basis for this verse of L’cha Dodi.

The Kabbalists also took this idea and instituted lighting 2 Shabbat candles that together cast 1 light (Ibn Gikatalia, Shaarei Orah I 136; Rabbi Yaacov Landau, Seder Agur 358; Reuven Kimmelman, p. 37-41). They also noticed that “zachor” (“remember”) sounds like “zachar” (“male”), while “shamor” (“observe”) starts with the same letter as “Shechina” (“the Divine Presence”, thought to be G-d’s female side). Thus, for the Kabbalists Shabbat represented a uniting of G-d’s various facets.

The phrase “l’sheim ultiferet v’litehila” comes from Jeremiah 13:11 and can also be found paraphrased in Deuteronomy 26:19.

When have you said one thing and somebody else thought you said something different?

(כב) לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת לְכוּ וְנֵלְכָה, כִּי הִיא מְקוֹר הַבְּרָכָה, מֵרֹאשׁ מִקֶּדֶם נְסוּכָה, סוֹף מַעֲשֶׂה בְּמַחֲשָׁבָה תְּחִלָּה:

(22) Let us go out to greet Shabbat, source of blessing, conceived at the beginning of time, finally formed at the end of six days.

Context: This is the second verse of L’cha Dodi. It is based on Isaiah 46:10, where G-d says that everything G-d was going to do has been planned out. From this, the Kabbalists developed the idea of Shabbat as having been part of the blueprint of Creation, even though it didn’t come until the 7th “day”. The phrase “l’chu v’neilcha” comes from I Samuel 9:9 and Isaiah 2:5, while “meirosh mikedem” comes from Proverbs 8:23. There is an allusion to the Kabbalists’ custom of going out into the fields to greet Shabbat.

In what way has Shabbat been a source of blessing for you?

(כה) מִקְדַּשׁ מֶלֶךְ עִיר מְלוּכָה, קוּמִי צְאִי מִתּוֹךְ הַהֲפֵכָה, רַב לָךְ שֶׁבֶת בְּעֵמֶק הַבָּכָא, וְהוּא יַחְמוֹל עָלַיִךְ חֶמְלָה:

(25) Shrine of our sovereign, royal city, rise up, come forth from upheaval and fear no more. End your dwelling in the tear-filled valley, for with God’s compassion you will be upraised.

Context: This is the third verse of L’cha Dodi. The words switch from talking about Shabbat to talking about Jerusalem here. The imagery, drawn from the Book of Eicha, is that Jerusalem has been sitting shiva and now needs to rise. The phrase “yachmol alayich” comes from Jeremiah 15:5.

When have you come forth from upheaval?

(כז) הִתְנַעֲרִי מֵעָפָר קוּמִי, לִבְשִׁי בִּגְדֵי תִפְאַרְתֵּךְ עַמִּי, עַל יַד בֶּן יִשַּׁי בֵּית הַלַּחְמִי, קָרְבָה אֶל נַפְשִׁי גְּאָלָהּ:

(27) Awake! Rise up from the dust! Dress yourself in garments of glory. By the hand of Jesse’s son, of Bethlehem’s tribe, bring my redemption without further delays.

Context: This is the fourth verse of L’cha Dodi. Covering oneself in dust and shabby clothing is a sign of mourning, such as what Mordechai did when he heard the extermination decree (Esther 4:1). The phrase “hitna’ari mei-afar kumi” comes from Isaiah 52:2, while “livshi bigdei tifarteich” comes from Isaiah 52:1, where Jerusalem is told to stop mourning, presumably for her lost children. These verses are part of the Haftarah for Parashat Shoftim, one of the Haftarot of Consolation between Tisha B’Av and Rosh Hashanah.

Although this verse is about Jerusalem, it can also be thought of as relating to Shabbat with the idea that regardless of how bad the week was we can leave it aside as we step into the “palace of time” of Shabbat (to borrow Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel’s language in The Sabbath).

When have you felt like you’ve worn “garments of glory”?

(כט) הִתְעוֹרְרִי, הִתְעוֹרְרִי, כִּי בָא אוֹרֵךְ קוּמִי אוֹרִי, עוּרִי עוּרִי שִׁיר דַּבֵּרִי, כְּבוֹד יְהֹוָה עָלַיִךְ נִגְלָה:

(29) Rouse yourself, rouse yourself, for your light has come; let the light rise up and glow. Awake awake, utter songs of praise, for God’s glory is revealed to your gaze.

Context: This is the fifth verse of L’cha Dodi. The phrase “Hitor’ri hitor’ri…kumi” comes from Isaiah 51:17 (the Haftarah for Parashat Shoftim, and one of the Haftarot of Consolation between Tisha B’Av and Rosh Hashanah), “uri uri shir dabeiri” comes from the Song of Deborah, Judges 5:12, while “k’vod Adonai alayich nigla” comes from Isaiah 40:5 (the Haftarah for Parashat Vaetchanan and the first Haftarah of Consolation).

The word “oreich” (your light) is the midpoint of this prayer, with 65 words before it and 65 words after it. This seems to suggest that Shabbat may bring light into our lives. Similarly, the words “uri uri”, “awake, awake” could be taken to urge us to spiritually wake up to see G-d’s presence in the world.

When has your light come?

(לא) לֹא תֵבוֹשִׁי וְלֹא תִכָּלְמִי, מַה תִּשְׁתּוֹחֲחִי וּמַה תֶּהֱמִי, בָּךְ יֶחֱסוּ עֲנִיֵּי עַמִּי, וְנִבְנְתָה עִיר עַל תִּלָּהּ:

(31) Do not be embarrassed, do not be ashamed. Why are you downcast? Why do you moan? The poorest of your people, trust in this: the city will be rebuilt as in ancient days.

Context: This is the sixth verse of L’cha Dodi. Many people switch tunes here. The phrase “Lo teivoshi v’lo tikalmi” here is related to the phrase “v’lo neivosh v’lo nikaleim” in the “V’ha-eir eineinu” section of “Ahava Rabba”; it comes from Isaiah 54:4 (the Haftarah for Parashat Ki Teitzei and one of the Haftarot of Consolation between Tisha B’Av and Rosh Hashanah).

Is there a time when you have felt embarrassed or ashamed?

(לג) וְהָיוּ לִמְשִׁסָּה שׁוֹסַיִךְ, וְרָחֲקוּ כָּל מְבַלְּעָיִךְ, יָשִׂישׂ עָלַיִךְ אֱלֹהָיִךְ, כִּמְשׂוֹשׂ חָתָן עַל כַּלָּה:

(33) Your despoilers shall be despoiled, your tormentors removed far away. God and you will celebrate together, a bride and groom in joyful embrace.

Context: This is the seventh verse of L’cha Dodi.

Have you ever experienced people getting their just rewards?

(לה) יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאל תִּפְרוֹצִי, וְאֶת יְהֹוָה תַּעֲרִיצִי, עַל יַד אִישׁ בֶּן פַּרְצִי, וְנִשְׂמְחָה וְנָגִילָה:

(35) You will spread out to the left and right, acclaiming Adonai our God with delight. Redeemed by the scion of Peretz’s line, we shall joyously chant songs of praise.

Context: This is the eighth verse of L’cha Dodi. Peretz was the son of Judah through Tamar. He became the ancestor of Boaz, who married Ruth. Boaz and Ruth were the great-grandparents of King David, from whom the messiah is supposed to descend. The phrase “yamin usmol tifrotzi” comes from Isaiah 54:3 (the Haftarah for Parashat Ki Teitzei and one of the Haftarot of Consolation between Tisha B’Av and Rosh Hashanah), while “v’nism’cha v’nagila” comes from Song of Songs 1:4. There is a pun between “partzi” and “tifrotzi”.

When one spreads out, one often encounters others. When is a time you have tried to spread your ideas to other people, and how did that go?

(לח) בֹּאִי בְשָׁלוֹם עֲטֶרֶת בַּעְלָהּ, גַּם בְּרִנָּה (ביו"ט מוסיפים: בְּשִׂמְחָה) וּבְצָהֳלָה, תּוֹךְ אֱמוּנֵי עַם סְגֻלָּה: בֹּאִי כַלָּה, בֹּאִי כַלָּה:

(38) Come in peace, crown of your spouse, surrounded by gladness and joyous shouts. Come to the faithful, the people You treasure with pride, come, my bride; come, my bride.

Context: This is the ninth and final verse of L’cha Dodi. We are back to talking about Shabbat. It is customary at this verse to stand and face the door, bowing left on the first “Bo’i Kallah” and then right on the second “Bo’i Kallah” as the Sabbath Bride symbolically enters at that point. Sefardic Jews say “gam b’rina” (also [come] with song) while Ashkenazic Jews say “gam b’simcha” (also [come] with joy), which is a phrase that Sefardic Jews only add when Shabbat and a Festival overlap.

Building on this idea of inviting in Shabbat, the Zohar (mystical text attributed to Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai but probably actually written by Moses de Leon in the 1200s in Spain) takes a verse from Isaiah about calling Shabbat a delight (Isaiah 58:13) and says that this means inviting Shabbat to come in to our homes that are set up to honor and welcome her. (Zohar 3:94b:7).

The phrase “ateret ba’la” comes from Proverbs 12:4, while “l’am segulah” comes from Deuteronomy 7:6.

After this verse, those who are in mourning come into the service, since they are not feeling the anticipatory joy leading up to the entrance of Shabbat. The mourners are greeted with the phrase “HaMakom y’nachem etchem b’toch sha’ar aveilei Tziyon virushalayim” - “May you be comforted among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.” Some synagogues add this every week, recognizing that they don’t know the personal losses of everybody attending a service.

We welcome Shabbat to come in peace. When have you experienced a moment of a peaceful Shabbat?

The Music of L’cha Dodi

L’cha Dodi doesn’t have a specific tune that it is traditionally done to, other than “Eili Tziyon” the Friday evening before Tisha B’Av, so there has been much room for congregational melodies. Some tunes have been written specifically for this prayer, while others have been contrafacted from other songs. In 2021, the Cantors Assembly released a set of videos with a different tune for each day of the Omer; they had so many that they released “outtakes” that didn’t make the top 49 submissions (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CO-AP1a71Go&list=PLKK5_3wTHcbpNAlIQqV2H7ukjAAgNVR96). Here are 9 versions, one for each verse. Consider which tunes fit the mood of the words.

Not sure who wrote this tune for L'cha Dodi.

Not sure who wrote this, but it's not Cantor Aaron Bensoussan. You can hear his version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzVrp5J0uJI

This is from the Maccabeats in 2010, singing L'cha Dodi to Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" (through 3:16 - thereafter they sing Aleinu). For a very different singing group take on L'cha Dodi, you can see the Reut Choir Haifa sing Louis Lewandowki's version from the 1800s here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__wPfpJr94Q

Context: This tune comes from Kol HaNeshama, a congregation in Jerusalem. The video shows text from Tefillah Trainer, a product of Kinnor Software that was notated by Cantor Neil Schwartz

​​​​​​​Another tune; not sure who wrote this one.

L'cha Dodi as sung by the Abayudaya Jews of Uganda (for a Moroccan version, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LkCYloa_fU)

One of the tunes for L'cha Dodi written by Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach (you can hear the other one here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtEvj2HBMHw).

Craig Taubman's version of L'cha Dodi.

Debbie Friedman's version of L'cha Dodi.

With appreciation to Rabbi Dina Rosenberg, Josh Franklin, Shir Yaakov Feit, Lawrence Szenes-Strauss, Rabbi Ahuvah Loewenthal, Yasmine Torbati, Siddur Lev Shalem

Appendix A: The Full Text of L’cha Dodi in 3 Translations

(יח) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(יט) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(כ) שָׁמוֹר וְזָכוֹר בְּדִבּוּר אֶחָד, הִשְׁמִיעָנוּ אֵל הַמְּיֻחָד, יְהֹוָה אֶחָד וּשְׁמוֹ אֶחָד, לְשֵׁם וּלְתִפְאֶרֶת ולִתְהִלָּה:

(כא) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(כב) לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת לְכוּ וְנֵלְכָה, כִּי הִיא מְקוֹר הַבְּרָכָה, מֵרֹאשׁ מִקֶּדֶם נְסוּכָה, סוֹף מַעֲשֶׂה בְּמַחֲשָׁבָה תְּחִלָּה:

(כג) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(כד) ביום טוב ובשבת חול המועד מדלגים ל:יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאל תִּפְרוֹצִי

(כה) מִקְדַּשׁ מֶלֶךְ עִיר מְלוּכָה, קוּמִי צְאִי מִתּוֹךְ הַהֲפֵכָה, רַב לָךְ שֶׁבֶת בְּעֵמֶק הַבָּכָא, וְהוּא יַחְמוֹל עָלַיִךְ חֶמְלָה:

(כו) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(כז) הִתְנַעֲרִי מֵעָפָר קוּמִי, לִבְשִׁי בִּגְדֵי תִפְאַרְתֵּךְ עַמִּי, עַל יַד בֶּן יִשַּׁי בֵּית הַלַּחְמִי, קָרְבָה אֶל נַפְשִׁי גְּאָלָהּ:

(כח) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(כט) הִתְעוֹרְרִי, הִתְעוֹרְרִי, כִּי בָא אוֹרֵךְ קוּמִי אוֹרִי, עוּרִי עוּרִי שִׁיר דַּבֵּרִי, כְּבוֹד יְהֹוָה עָלַיִךְ נִגְלָה:

(ל) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(לא) לֹא תֵבוֹשִׁי וְלֹא תִכָּלְמִי, מַה תִּשְׁתּוֹחֲחִי וּמַה תֶּהֱמִי, בָּךְ יֶחֱסוּ עֲנִיֵּי עַמִּי, וְנִבְנְתָה עִיר עַל תִּלָּהּ:

(לב) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(לג) וְהָיוּ לִמְשִׁסָּה שׁוֹסַיִךְ, וְרָחֲקוּ כָּל מְבַלְּעָיִךְ, יָשִׂישׂ עָלַיִךְ אֱלֹהָיִךְ, כִּמְשׂוֹשׂ חָתָן עַל כַּלָּה:

(לד) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(לה) יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאל תִּפְרוֹצִי, וְאֶת יְהֹוָה תַּעֲרִיצִי, עַל יַד אִישׁ בֶּן פַּרְצִי, וְנִשְׂמְחָה וְנָגִילָה:

(לו) לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה, פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

(לז) חרוז זה של בואי בשלום יאמר האדם בשמחה עצומה עד מאד. כי בחרוז זה מקבל האדם נפש יתירה דליל שבת קודש ואנו קוראין לשכינה הקדושה בואי בשלום עטרת בעלה כו׳ תוך אמוני עם סגולה פי׳ שתשרה עלינו עם קדוש הישראלי שנקראים עם סגולה בסוד נפש יתירה: (יסוד ושרש העבודה)

(לח) בֹּאִי בְשָׁלוֹם עֲטֶרֶת בַּעְלָהּ, גַּם בְּרִנָּה (ביו"ט מוסיפים: בְּשִׂמְחָה) וּבְצָהֳלָה, תּוֹךְ אֱמוּנֵי עַם סְגֻלָּה: בֹּאִי כַלָּה, בֹּאִי כַלָּה, בֹּאִי כַלָּה, שַׁבָּת מַלְכְּתָא:

(18) Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(19) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(20) “Preserve” and “Remember” in a single utterance the One Almighty caused us to hear; Adonoy is One, and His Name is One; for fame, for glory, and for praise.

(21) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(22) To greet the Sabbath, come let us go for it is the source of blessing; from the very beginning, of old, it was appointed; last in creation, first in [God's] thought.

(23) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(24) On Yom Tov and Chol Hamoed skip to יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאל

(25) Sanctuary of the King, royal city, arise, come forth from the upheaval; too long have you dwelt in the valley of weeping; He will show you abundant pity.

(26) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(27) Shake the dust off yourself, arise, dress up in your garments of glory, my people; through the son of Yishai the Bethlehemite, draw near to my soul and redeem it.

(28) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(29) Wake up! wake up! for your light has come, arise and shine. Awaken! awaken! utter a song, The glory of Adonoy is revealed upon you.

(30) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(31) Feel not ashamed or humiliated why are you bowed down, why do you moan? In you will take refuge the poor of my people; and the city will be rebuilt on its ancient site.

(32) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(33) They will be ravaged, those who ravaged you, and they will be cast far off, all who devour you. Your God will rejoice over you as a bridegroom rejoices over his bride.

(34) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(35) Right and left you will spread out. and Adonoy, you will praise; through the man descended from Peretz we will rejoice and exult.

(36) Refrain: Come my Beloved Friend to greet the bride, let us welcome the Sabbath.

(37) The chazzan and congregation turn to face the entrance while reciting this verse. While saying the words בּוֹאִי כַלָּה , Come Bride bow and turn back, to signify that the Sabbath is entering.

(38) Come in peace, crown of her husband, come with song, (rejoicing) and good cheer; amidst the faithful of the treasured people. Come Bride, come Bride, come Bride, Shabbos Queen!

לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה. פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

שָׁמוֹר וְזָכוֹר בְּדִבּוּר אֶחָד, הִשְמִיעָנוּ אֵל הַמְּיֻחָד. יְיָ אֶחָד וּשְמוֹ אֶחָד. לְשֵׁם וּלְתִפְאֶרֶת וְלִתְהִלָּה: לכה

לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת לְכוּ וְנֵלְכָה. כִּי הִיא מְקוֹר הַבְּרָכָה. מֵרֹאשׁ מִקֶּדֶם נְסוּכָה. סוֹף מַעֲשֶׂה בְּמַחֲשָׁבָה תְּחִלָּה: לכה

מִקְדַּשׁ מֶלֶךְ עִיר מְלוּכָה. קוּמִי צְאִי מִתּוֹךְ הַהֲפֵכָה. רַב לָךְ שֶׁבֶת בְּעֵמֶק הַבָּכָא. וְהוּא יַחֲמוֹל עָלַיִךְ חֶמְלָה: לכה

הִתְנַעֲרִי מֵעָפָר קוּמִי. לִבְשִׁי בִּגְדֵי תִפְאַרְתֵּךְ עַמִּי: עַל יַד בֶּן יִשַׁי בֵּית הַלַּחְמִי. קָרְבָה אֶל נַפְשִׁי גְאָלָהּ: לכה

הִתְעוֹרְרִי הִתְעוֹרְרִי. כִּי בָא אוֹרֵךְ קוּמִי אוֹרִי. עוּרִי עוּרִי שִׁיר דַבֵּרִי. כְּבוֹד יְיָ עָלַיִךְ נִגְלָה: לכה

לֹא תֵבוֹשִׁי וְלֹא תִכָּלְמִי. מַה תִּשְתּוֹחֲחִי וּמַה תֶּהֱמִי. בָּךְ יֶחֱסוּ עֲנִיֵּי עַמִּי, וְנִבְנְתָה עִיר עַל תִּלָּהּ: לכה

וְהָיוּ לִמְשִׁסָּה שֹׁאסָיִךְ. וְרָחֲקוּ כָּל מְבַלְּעָיִךְ. יָשִׂישׂ עָלַיִךְ אֱלֹהָיִךְ. כִּמְשׂוֹשׂ חָתָן עַל כַּלָּה: לכה

יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאל תִּפְרוֹצִי. וְאֶת־יְיָ תַּעֲרִיצִי. עַל יַד אִישׁ בֶּן פַּרְצִי. וְנִשְׂמְחָה וְנָגִילָה: לכה

בּוֹאִי בְשָׁלוֹם עֲטֶרֶת בַּעְלָהּ. גַּם בְּשִׂמְחָה וּבְצָהֳלָה. תּוֹךְ אֱמוּנֵי עַם סְגֻּלָּה. בּוֹאִי כַלָּה, בּוֹאִי כַלָּה: לכה:

Go forth my love to meet the bride.

Shabbat's reception has arrived!

"Observe" and "remember"-two words

as one,

Proclaimed by the Only, forgotten by none.

Adonai is One. His name is One.

Praised, and renowned, and glorified.

Go forth my love ...

To meet Shabbat, come, let us go

For she is the source from which blessings

now.

From creation's beginning a royal veiled

glow

The last thought created, the first sanctified.

Go forth my love ...

Regal city, the king's holy shrine,

Rise up and leave your upheaval behind.

Too long in the valley of tears have you

pined.

The Compassionate One will compassion

provide.

Go forth my love ...

Shake off the ashes. Rise up from them!

Wear glorious clothes, my people, my gem.

Through the son of Yishai of Bethlehem

Redeem my soul. Draw near to my side.

Go forth my love ...

O'Awake, awake! Your light is here.

Arise. shine out light bold and clear:

Wake up! Wake up! Sing verse to hear:

Through you the presence of God comes

alive.

Go forth my love ...

Be not despondent. Be not cast down.

Why be dejected; why face the ground?

In a city rebuilt on its own ancient mound,

The poor of my people find shelter inside.

Go forth my love ...

Shunned are all who would shun you.

Gone are those who'd overrun you.

The joy of your God shines upon you

Like the joy of a groom and a bride.

Go forth my love ...

Spread out to the left and the right

Proclaiming the Holy One's might.

We'll revel in our delight

Through Peretz's son magnified.

' Go forth my love ...

Come forth in peace her husband's pride,

Joyful, happy, gratified.

Into the midst of the faithful tribe,

Come forth bride; come forth bride!

Go forth my love ...

לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה. פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

שָׁמוֹר וְזָכוֹר בְּדִבּוּר אֶחָד, הִשְמִיעָֽנוּ אֵל הַמְּיֻחָד.
ה' אֶחָד וּשְמוֹ אֶחָד. לְשֵׁם וּלְתִפְאֶֽרֶת וְלִתְהִלָּה:

לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת לְכוּ וְנֵלְכָה. כִּי הִיא מְקוֹר הַבְּרָכָה.
מֵרֹאשׁ מִקֶּֽדֶם נְסוּכָה. סוֹף מַעֲשֶׂה בְּמַחֲשָׁבָה תְּחִלָּה:

מִקְדַּשׁ מֶֽלֶךְ עִיר מְלוּכָה. קֽוּמִי צְאִי מִתּוֹךְ הַהֲפֵכָה.
רַב לָךְ שֶֽׁבֶת בְּעֵֽמֶק הַבָּכָא. וְהוּא יַחֲמוֹל עָלַֽיִךְ חֶמְלָה:

הִתְנַעֲרִי מֵעָפָר קוּמִי. לִבְשִׁי בִּגְדֵי תִפְאַרְתֵּךְ עַמִּי:
עַל יַד בֶּן יִשַׁי בֵּית הַלַּחְמִי. קָרְבָה אֶל נַפְשִׁי גְאָלָהּ:

הִתְעוֹרְרִי הִתְעוֹרְרִי. כִּי בָא אוֹרֵךְ
קֽֽוּמִי אֽוֹרִי.
עֽוּרִי עֽוּרִי שִׁיר דַבֵּֽרִי. כְּבוֹד ה' עָלַֽיִךְ נִגְלָה.

לא תֵבושי וְלא תִכָּלְמִי. מַה תִּשתּוחֲחִי וּמַה תֶּהֱמִי.
בָּךְ יֶחֱסוּ עֲנִיֵּי עַמִּי. וְנִבְנְתָה עִיר עַל תִּלָּהּ.

וְהָיוּ לִמְשסָּה שאסָיִךְ. וְרָחֲקוּ כָּל מְבַלְּעָיִךְ.
יָשיש עָלַיִךְ אֱלקָיִךְ. כִּמְשוש חָתָן עַל כַּלָּה.

יָמִין וּשמאל תִּפְרוצִי. וְאֶת ה' תַּעֲרִיצִי.
עַל יַד אִיש בֶּן פַּרְצִי. וְנִשמְחָה וְנָגִילָה.

לְכָה דודִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה. פְּנֵי שבָּת נְקַבְּלָה.

בּֽוֹאִי בְשָׁלוֹם עֲטֶרֶת בַּעְלָהּ. גַּם בְּרנה וּבְצָהֳלָה.
תּוֹךְ אֱמוּנֵי עַם סְגֻּלָּה. בּֽוֹאִי כַלָּה, בּֽוֹאִי כַלָּה:

לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה. פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:

Come, my friend, to meet the bride; let us welcome the Sabbath.


“Ob​serve” and “Rememb​er,” in a single command, the One
God announced​ to us. The Lord is One, and his name is One, for
fame,​ for glory and for praise.

Come,​​​ let us go to meet the Sabbath, for it is a source of bles-
sing.​ From the very beginning​ it was ordained;​ last in creation,​
first​ in God’s plan.

Shrin​e of the King, royal city, arise! Come forth from thy ruins.
Long enough have you dwelt in the vale of tears! He will show
you abundant mercy.

Shake​ off your dust, arise! Put on your glorious garments,​ my
peopl​e, and pray: “Be near to my soul, and redeem it through
the son of Jesse, the Bethlehem​ite.”


Besti​r yourself,​​ bestir yourself,​​ for your light has come; arise
and shine! Awake, awake, utter a song; the Lord’s glory is revealed
upon you.


Be not ashamed nor confounde​d. Why are you downcast?​ Why
do you moan? The afflicted​ of my people will be sheltered​ within
you; the city shall be rebuilt on its ancient site.


Those​ who despoiled​ you shall become a spoil, and all who
would​ devour you shall be far away. Your God will rejoice over
you as a bridegroo​m rejoices over his bride.


You shall extend to the right and to the left, and you shall re-
vere the Lord. Through the advent of a descendan​t of Perez we
shall​ rejoice and exult.
Come,​​​ my friend, to meet the bride; let us welcome the Sabbath.

Come in peace, crown of God, come with joy and cheerfuln​ess;
amids​t the faithful of the chosen people come O bride; come, O bride.

Come,​​​ my friend, to meet the bride; let us welcome the Sabbath.