Sukkah 47b:10סוכה מ״ז ב
The William Davidson Talmudתלמוד מהדורת ויליאם דוידסון
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47bמ״ז ב

מאי לאו זמן לא ברכת המזון ותפלה

What, is it not that the blessing mentioned is the blessing of time, in support of the opinion of Rabbi Yoḥanan? The Gemara rejects this possibility: No, the blessing here is Grace after Meals and the Amida prayer, where mention is made of the Eighth Day of Assembly and not of Sukkot. Therefore, there is no support for the opinion of Rabbi Yoḥanan that one recites the blessing of time on the Eighth Day of Assembly.

הכי נמי מסתברא דאי ס"ד זמן זמן כל שבעה מי איכא הא לא קשיא דאי לא בריך האידנא מברך למחר או ליומא אחרינא

The Gemara says: So too, it is reasonable that this is the proper understanding of the baraita, as should it enter your mind that the baraita is referring to the blessing of time, is there a blessing of time all seven days of Sukkot? One recites the blessing only on the first day. The Gemara responds: This is not difficult, and that is no proof that the baraita is not referring to the blessing of time, as the baraita could mean that if one did not recite the blessing today, on the first day, he recites the blessing on the next day or on another day of the Festival. Under those circumstances the blessing of time may be recited on any of the seven days.

מ"מ כוס בעינן לימא מסייע ליה לר"נ דאמר רב נחמן זמן אומרו אפילו בשוק דאי אמרת בעינן כוס כוס כל יומא מי איכא דלמא דאיקלע ליה כוס

The Gemara asks: How could one recite the blessing of time on each of the days of Sukkot if in any case we require the blessing to be recited over a cup of wine, and not everyone has access to wine during the intermediate days of the Festival? From the fact that the Gemara does not consider this factor, let us say that this baraita supports the opinion of Rav Naḥman, as Rav Naḥman said: One recites the blessing of time even in the marketplace, without wine, as, if you say that we require a cup of wine in order to recite the blessing of time, is there a cup of wine available every day that would enable one to recite the blessing during the intermediate days of the Festival? The Gemara rejects this proof: Perhaps the baraita is referring to a case where a cup of wine happened to become available to him. The baraita is not describing the preferred method of reciting the blessing but merely a possibility.

וסבר ר' יהודה שמיני טעון לינה והא תניא רבי יהודה אומר מנין לפסח שני שאינו טעון לינה שנא' (דברים טז, ז) ופנית בבקר והלכת לאהליך וכתיב (דברים טז, ח) ששת ימים תאכל מצות את שטעון ששה טעון לינה את שאינו טעון ששה אינו טעון לינה למעוטי מאי לאו למעוטי נמי שמיני של חג

The Gemara asks: And does Rabbi Yehuda really hold that the Eighth Day of Assembly requires one to stay overnight at its conclusion? But wasn’t it taught in a baraita that Rabbi Yehuda says: From where is it derived that the second Pesaḥ, when the Paschal lamb is brought by those who were impure and unable to sacrifice it on the first Pesaḥ, does not require staying overnight at its conclusion? As it is stated with regard to the first Pesaḥ: “And you shall turn in the morning and go unto your tents” (Deuteronomy 16:7), and immediately thereafter it is written: “Six days you shall eat matzot (Deuteronomy 16:8). From the juxtaposition of these two verses Rabbi Yehuda derives the following: That which requires observance of the six subsequent days requires staying overnight; that which does not require observance of the six subsequent days does not require staying overnight. What does this juxtaposition come to exclude? Is it not to exclude the eighth day of the Festival, as it is not followed by the observance of six days?

לא למעוטי פסח שני דכוותיה הכי נמי מסתברא דתנן הביכורים טעונין קרבן ושיר ותנופה ולינה מאן שמעת ליה דאמר תנופה רבי יהודה וקאמר טעון לינה

The Gemara rejects this: No, it comes to exclude the second Pesaḥ, which is similar to the first Pesaḥ in terms of its offering, and it teaches that since it is not followed by the observance of six days there is no obligation to stay overnight. The Gemara says: So too, it is reasonable to say that Rabbi Yehuda is excluding the second Pesaḥ, as we learned in a mishna: The first fruits require a peace-offering to be brought with them, a song unique to the occasion, sung by the Levites, waving, and staying overnight. Whom did you hear who said that first fruits require waving? It is Rabbi Yehuda, and the mishna is saying that first fruits require staying overnight. Apparently, Rabbi Yehuda excludes only the second Pesaḥ from the requirement of staying overnight.

דתניא ר' יהודה אומר (דברים כו, י) והנחתו זו תנופה אתה אומר זו תנופה או אינו אלא הנחה ממש כשהוא אומר והניחו הרי הנחה אמור הא מה אני מקיים והנחתו זו תנופה

Rabbi Yehuda holds that first fruits require waving, as it was taught in a baraita: Rabbi Yehuda says that it is stated with regard to first fruits: “And you shall set it down before the Lord your God,” (Deuteronomy 26:10), and this is referring to waving before the altar the basket containing the first fruits. Do you say that this is referring to waving, or perhaps it is referring only to actually setting it down adjacent to the altar? When the Torah says: “And the priest shall take the basket from your hand and set it down before the altar of the Lord your God” (Deuteronomy 26:4), setting it down is already stated. How, then, do I establish the meaning of the verse: “And you shall set it down”? This is referring to waving.

ודלמא ר"א בן יעקב היא דתניא (דברים כו, ד) ולקח הכהן הטנא מידך לימד על הביכורים שטעונין תנופה דברי ר"א בן יעקב

The Gemara asks: And perhaps the baraita that requires one to stay overnight when bringing first fruits to Jerusalem is not in accordance with Rabbi Yehuda’s opinion. Rather, it is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov, who also holds that first fruits require waving. As it was taught in a baraita that it is written: “And the priest shall take the basket from your hand” (Deuteronomy 26:4), which taught concerning first fruits that they require waving. This is the statement of Rabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov.

מ"ט דר"א בן יעקב אתיא יד יד משלמים כתיב הכא ולקח הכהן הטנא מידך וכתיב התם (ויקרא ז, ל) ידיו תביאינה את אשי ה'

The Gemara asks: What is the rationale for the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov? How does he derive the waving of the first fruits from this verse? The Gemara answers: This is derived by means of a verbal analogy between the term “hand” written with regard to first fruits and the term “hand” written with regard to a peace-offering. It is written here, with regard to first fruits: “And the priest shall take the basket from your hand,” and it is written there, with regard to a peace-offering: “His own hands shall bring the offerings of the Lord made by fire; the fat with the breast shall he bring, that the breast may be waved before the Lord” (Leviticus 7:30).

מה כאן כהן אף להלן כהן ומה להלן בעלים אף כאן בעלים הא כיצד כהן מניח ידו תחת יד בעלים ומניף

In addition, one can derive by means of the verbal analogy that just as here, with regard to first fruits, a priest performs the waving, so too, with regard to a peace-offering, a priest performs the waving. And just as there, with regard to a peace-offering, the owner performs the waving, so too here, with regard to first fruits, the owner performs the waving. How so? How can both the priest and the owner perform the waving? The owner places his hands beneath the peace-offering or under the first fruits, and the priest places his hand under the hand of the owner and waves it together with him. In any event, Rabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov requires waving of the first fruits. Therefore, it is possible that the baraita is stated in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov and no conclusive proof can be cited with regard to the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda.

מאי הוי עלה רב נחמן אמר אומרים זמן בשמיני של חג ורב ששת אמר אין אומרים זמן בשמיני של חג והלכתא אומרים זמן בשמיני של חג

What halakhic conclusion was reached concerning the blessing of time? Rav Naḥman said: One recites the blessing of time on the eighth day of the festival of Sukkot. And Rav Sheshet said: One does not recite the blessing of time on the eighth day of the Festival. The Gemara concludes: And the halakha is that one recites the blessing of time on the eighth day of the Festival.

תניא כוותי' דרב נחמן שמיני

The Gemara notes: It was taught in a baraita in accordance with the opinion of Rav Naḥman: The eighth day