Sukkah 37bסוכה ל״ז ב
The William Davidson Talmudתלמוד מהדורת ויליאם דוידסון
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37bל״ז ב

הא הפילו הוא כשר אמאי (במדבר יט, יז) ולקחו ונתן אמר רחמנא אלא לאו שמע מינה לקיחה ע"י דבר אחר שמה לקיחה

By inference, if he spilled the ashes intentionally from the tube into the water, it is fit. Why? Doesn’t the Merciful One say in the Torah: “And for the impure they shall take of the ashes of the burning of the purification from sin, and he places running water upon them in a vessel” (Numbers 19:17). Apparently, one must mix the water and the ashes intentionally. Rather, may one not conclude from it that taking by means of another object is considered taking?

ואמר רבה לא לדוץ איניש לולבא בהושענא דדלמא נתרי טרפי והוי חציצה ורבא אמר מין במינו אינו חוצץ

And Rabba said with regard to the lulav: After binding the myrtle branches and willow branches, let a person not insert the lulav into the binding of the four species, as perhaps as a result the leaves will fall from the branches and the leaves will constitute an interposition between the various species. And Rava said: An object of one species does not interpose before an object of the same species.

ואמר רבה לא ליגוז איניש לולבא בהושענא דמשתיירי הוצא והוי חציצה ורבא אמר מין במינו אינו חוצץ

And Rabba said: Let a person not cut the lulav in order to shorten it while it is in the binding of the four species, as perhaps as a result leaves will become detached and will constitute an interposition between the various species. And Rava said: An object of one species does not interpose before an object of the same species.

ואמר רבה הדס של מצוה אסור להריח בו אתרוג של מצוה מותר להריח בו מ"ט הדס דלריחא קאי כי אקצייה מריחא אקצייה אתרוג דלאכילה קאי כי אקצייה מאכילה אקצייה

§ And Rabba said: It is prohibited to smell the myrtle branch used in fulfillment of the mitzva. However, it is permitted to smell the etrog used in fulfillment of the mitzva. The Gemara asks: What is the reason for the distinction between them? The Gemara answers: With regard to a myrtle branch, which exists primarily for its fragrance, when he sets it aside exclusively for the mitzva, he sets it aside from enjoying its fragrance. With regard to an etrog, on the other hand, which exists primarily for eating, when he sets it aside exclusively for the mitzva, he sets it aside from eating. However, he never intended to prohibit this ancillary pleasure.

ואמר רבה הדס במחובר מותר להריח בו אתרוג במחובר אסור להריח בו מ"ט הדס דלהריח קאי אי שרית ליה לא אתי למגזייה אתרוג דלאכילה קאי אי שרית ליה אתי למגזייה

And Rabba said: With regard to a myrtle branch, while it is attached to the tree, it is permitted to smell it on Shabbat. With regard to an etrog, while it is attached to the tree, it is prohibited to smell it. The Gemara explains: What is the reason for the difference between them? With regard to a myrtle branch, which exists primarily to smell it, if you permit him to smell it, he will not come to cut it. Once he has smelled it, he has no further use for it. With regard to an etrog, which exists primarily for eating, one may not smell it because if you permit him to do so, the concern is that he will come to cut it from the tree to eat it.

ואמר רבה לולב בימין ואתרוג בשמאל מ"ט הני תלתא מצות והאי חדא מצוה א"ל ר' ירמיה לר' זריקא מאי טעם לא מברכינן אלא על נטילת לולב הואיל וגבוה מכולן ולגבהיה לאתרוג ולבריך א"ל הואיל ובמינו גבוה מכולן:

§ And Rabba said: One takes the lulav bound with the other two species in the right hand and the etrog in the left. The Gemara explains: What is the reason for that arrangement? These species constitute three mitzvot, and this etrog is only one mitzva. One accords deference to the greater number of mitzvot by taking the three species in the right hand. Rabbi Yirmeya said to Rabbi Zerika: What is the reason that we recite the blessing only with the formula: About taking the lulav, with no mention of the other species? Rabbi Zerika said to him: Since it is highest of them all and the most conspicuous, the other species are subsumed under it. Rabbi Yirmeya asks: And if that is the only reason, let him lift the etrog higher than the lulav and recite the blessing mentioning it. Rabbi Zerika said to him that he meant: Since the tree of its species is the tallest of them all, it is the most prominent, and therefore it is appropriate for the formula of the blessing to emphasize the lulav.

מתני׳ והיכן היו מנענעין בהודו לה' תחילה וסוף ובאנא ה' הושיעה נא דברי ב"ה וב"ש אומרין אף באנא ה' הצליחה נא א"ר עקיבא צופה הייתי ברבן גמליאל ור' יהושע שכל העם היו מנענעין את לולביהן והם לא נענעו אלא באנא ה' הושיעה נא:

MISHNA: And where in the recitation of hallel would they wave the lulav? They would do so at the verse: “Thank the Lord, for He is good” (Psalms 118:1, 29) that appears at both the beginning and the end of the psalm, and at the verse: “Lord, please save us” (Psalms 118:25); this is the statement of Beit Hillel. And Beit Shammai say: They would wave the lulav even at the verse: “Lord, please grant us success” (Psalms 118:25). Rabbi Akiva said: I was observing Rabban Gamliel and Rabbi Yehoshua and saw that all the people were waving their lulavim, and the two of them waved their lulav only at: “Lord, please save us,” indicating that this is the halakha.

גמ׳ נענוע מאן דכר שמיה התם קאי כל לולב שיש בו שלשה טפחים כדי לנענע בו כשר וקאמר היכן מנענעין

GEMARA: The Gemara asks about the premise of the mishna. With regard to waving, who mentioned it? As no previous mention was made of waving the lulav, it is a non sequitur when the tanna begins discussion of the details of the custom. The Gemara answers: The tanna is basing himself on the mishna there (29b), which states: Any lulav that has three handbreadths in length, sufficient to enable one to wave with it, is fit for use in fulfilling the mitzva. As the custom of waving the lulav was already established there, here the tanna is saying: Where would they wave the lulav?

תנן התם שתי הלחם ושני כבשי עצרת כיצד הוא עושה מניח שתי הלחם על גבי שני הכבשין ומניח ידו תחתיהן ומניף ומוליך ומביא מעלה ומוריד שנאמר (שמות כט, כז) אשר הונף ואשר הורם

We learned in a mishna there (Menaḥot 61a): With regard to the two loaves and the two lambs offered on the festival of Shavuot, how does he perform their waving before the altar? He places the two loaves atop the two lambs, and places his hand beneath them, and waves to and fro to each side, and he raises and lowers them, as it is stated: “Which is waved and which is lifted” (Exodus 29:27), indicating that there is waving to the sides as well as raising and lowering.

א"ר יוחנן מוליך ומביא למי שהארבע רוחות שלו מעלה ומוריד למי שהשמים והארץ שלו במערבא מתנו הכי א"ר חמא בר עוקבא א"ר יוסי ברבי חנינא מוליך ומביא כדי לעצור רוחות רעות מעלה ומוריד כדי לעצור טללים רעים א"ר יוסי בר אבין ואיתימא ר' יוסי בר זבילא זאת אומרת

Rabbi Yoḥanan said: He moves them to and fro to dedicate them to He Whom the four directions are His. He raises and lowers them to He Whom the heavens and earth are His. In the West, Eretz Yisrael, they taught it as follows. Rabbi Ḥama bar Ukva said that Rabbi Yosei, son of Rabbi Ḥanina, said: He moves them to and fro in order to request a halt to harmful winds, storms and tempests that come from all directions; he raises and lowers them in order to halt harmful dews and rains that come from above. Rabbi Yosei bar Avin said, and some say that it was Rabbi Yosei bar Zevila who said: That is to say,