Paragraph 155קנ״ה
1 א

כל נדר וכל שבועת איסר לענות נפש - למה נאמר? לפי שהוא אומר והפר את נדרה אשר עליה, שומע אני בין שיש בהן ענוי נפש בין שאין בהן ענוי נפש? ת"ל כל נדר וכל שבועת איסר לענות נפש אישה יקימנו ואישה יפרנו: לא אמרתי אלא נדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש. נדרים שהם בינו לבינה מנין? ת"ל אלה החקים אשר צוה ה' את משה בין איש לאשתו בין אב לבתו. שומע אני בין שיש בהן ענוי נפש ובין שאין בהן ענוי נפש? ת"ל כל נדר וכל שבועת איסר לענות נפש, ומה זה, נדר שאינו מתחלל אלא על פי אחרים, הוא מיפר - כך כל נדר שאינו מתחלל אלא על פי אחרים - הוא מיפר, דברי ר' יאשיה. ר' יונתן אומר: מצינו נדר שאינו מתחלל על ידי אחרים אלא בו - הרי הוא מפר! כאיזה צד? אמר קונם פירות העולם עלי - הרי זה יפר. קונם פירות מדינה זו עלי - יביא לה מן מדינה אחרת. פירות חנוני זה עלי - אין יכול להפר. אלא מה זה נדר שאין מתחלל ע"י אחרים אלא בו, הוא מפר. אין לי אלא בעל, שאינו מפר אלא נדר שיש בינו לבינה ונדר שיש בהם עינוי נפש. האב מנין? הרי אתה דן: הואיל והאב מפר והבעל מפר; מה הבעל, אין מפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש - האב לא יפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש. או חלוף: הואיל והאב מפר והבעל מפר, מה האב מפר כל נדר אף הבעל מפר כל נדר? הא מה אני מקיים כל נדר וכל שבועת איסר לענות נפש - בימי הבגר, אבל בימי הנעורים יפר כל נדריה? ת"ל בנעוריה בית אביה. נעורים בבית אביה אמרתי, ולא נעורים בבית הבעל. דנתי וחלפתי בטל וזכיתי לדין כבתחילה: הואיל והבעל מפר והאב מפר. מה הבעל אין מפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה, ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש - אף האב לא יפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש. ועוד ק"ו: מה הבעל, שמפר בבגר, אין מפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש - האב, שאין מפר בבגר, אינו דין?! לא: אם אמרת בבעל שאין הרשות מתרוקנת לו, לפיכך אין מפר אלא נדרים שבינו לבינה ונדרים שיש בהם ענוי נפש; תאמר באב שהרשות מתרוקנת לו, לפיכך יפר כל נדר! לא זכיתי לדין, ת"ל אלה החקים, על כרחך אתה מקיש את האב לבעל: מה הבעל אין מפר אלא נדר שיש בהם ענוי נפש אף האב יכול: אישה יקימנו ואישה יפרנו - נדרה מן התאנים ומן הענבים, קיים בתאנים - כולו קיים. היפר לתאנים - אין מופר עד שיפר לענבים, דברי ר' ישמעאל. ר' עקיבא אומר קיים לתאנים ולא קיים לענבים, שנאמר אישה יקימנו ואישה יפרנו. נדרה מן התאנים ומן הענבים, ונשאל לחכם והתיר לה לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים - כולו מותר. אסר לה לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים - אסור. הפר לה בעלה לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים - כולו מופר. קיים לה לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים - כולו קיים. אימתי? בזמן שהוא נדר אחד, אבל אם אמר שאני טועם, ועוד ענבים שאני טועם, ונשאל לחכם והתיר לו לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים, קיים לה לתאנים ולא לענבים, לענבים ולא לתאנים - הקיום בקיומו וההפר בהפירו:

(Bamidbar 30:14) "Every vow and every oath of binding to afflict the soul": What is the intent of this? From (Ibid. 9) "and he annul the vow which is upon her," I might think, whether or not it involves affliction. It is, therefore, written "Every vow and every oath of binding to afflict the soul, her husband shall confirm it and her husband shall annul it." Scripture speaks only of vows involving affliction. Whence do I derive (the same [i.e., that he may annul them]) for vows affecting relations between him and her? From (Ibid. 17) "These are the statutes which the L-rd commanded Moses, between a man and his wife, between a father and his daughter" — whether or not they entail affliction. And just as this vow (i.e., a vow involving affliction) is a vow which is not absolved by others (i.e., sages [but annulled by the husband]), so, all vows (i.e., those between husband and wife) which are not absolved by others (are annulled by the husband.) These are the words of R. Yoshiyah. R. Yonathan says: We find vows which are absolved by others and which may be annulled by the husband. How so? If she said: "I forbid the fruits of the world to myself," he may annul it. (If she said:) "I forbid the fruits of the province to myself," he can bring them from a different province. (If she said:) "I forbid the fruits of this shopkeeper to me," the husband cannot annul it. And if his livelihood came only from him, he can annul it. We find, then, that only a husband can annul only vows between him and her and vows entailing affliction. Whence do we derive the same for a father (vis-à-vis his daughter)? It follows (by induction), viz. Since a father can annul and a husband can annul, then just as a husband can annul only vows between him and her and vows involving affliction, so, a father. — But perhaps the reverse is true, viz.: Since a father can annul and a husband can annul, then just as a father can annul any vow, so, a husband can annul any vow. How, then, am I to understand "Every vow and every oath of binding to afflict the soul, her husband shall confirm it, etc."? As referring to the days of her maturity (bagruth), but in the days of her maidenhood (na'aruth), he may annul all of her vows. It is, therefore, written (Ibid. 17) "in her maidenhood in her father's house." (i.e., This distinction between 'na'aruth and bagruth) applies only in her father's house, but not in her husband's house. I have reasoned and reversed. The reversal was refuted, and I have "merited" returning to the original formulation, viz.: Since a husband can annul and a father can annul, then just as a husband can annul only vows between him and her and vows of affliction, so, a father. And, furthermore, it follows a fortiori, viz.: If a husband, who can annul in her maturity, can annul only vows between him and her and vows of affliction, how much more so a father! — No, this may be true of a husband, who does not have exclusive authority (in the annulment of vows) — wherefore he can annul only vows between him and her and vows of affliction, as opposed to a father, who does have such authority — wherefore he can annul all vows. I have not succeeded in deriving it by reasoning; it is, therefore, written "These are the statutes, etc." likening the father to the husband, viz.: Just as the husband can annul only vows between him and her and vows of affliction, so the father. "her husband shall confirm it and her husband shall annul it": If she vowed not to eat figs and grapes, and he confirmed it for figs, it is all confirmed. If he annulled it for figs, it is not annulled until he annulled it also for grapes. These are the words of R. Yishmael. R. Akiva says: If he confirmed it for figs but not for grapes, it is all confirmed. If he annulled it for figs, but not for grapes, it is all annulled, it being written "her husband shall confirm it and her husband shall annul it." Just as "shall confirm it" (connotes even) "part of it," so, "shall annul it" (connotes even) "part of it." If she vowed not to eat figs and grapes, and a sage was consulted (for absolution) and he (explicitly) permitted it for dates, but not for grapes, or for grapes, but not for figs, it is all permitted. If he forbade it for figs but not for grapes, or for grapes but not for figs, it is all forbidden. If he forbade it for figs, but not for grapes, or for grapes, but not for figs, it is forbidden. If her husband annulled it for figs but not for grapes, or for grapes but not for figs, it is all annulled. If he confirmed it for figs but not for grapes, or for grapes but not for figs, it is all confirmed. When is this so? When it is all one vow. But if she said: I vow not to eat figs, and, in addition, I vow not to eat grapes, and a sage were consulted, and he permitted it for figs, but not for grapes, or for grapes but not for figs — or if her husband annulled it for figs but not for grapes, or for grapes but not for figs, or if he confirmed it for figs but not for grapes or for grapes but not for figs — (then only) what was (specifically) confirmed is confirmed, and what was (specifically) annulled is annulled.