Menachot 18aמנחות י״ח א
The William Davidson Talmudתלמוד מהדורת ויליאם דוידסון
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18aי״ח א

ור' יהודה סבר בהנך פליגי להניח דברי הכל פסול מאי טעמא גזירה מקצת דמו אטו כל דמו וכל דמו פסולא דאורייתא

And Rabbi Yehuda holds that the Rabbis and Rabbi Eliezer disagree only in those cases, where one’s intention is to drink the blood or burn the meat of the offering. In those cases, the Rabbis deem the offering fit, since the improper intention involves making use of the item in an unusual manner. But if one’s intention is to leave of its blood until the next day, everyone agrees that the offering is unfit. What is the reason for this? It is a rabbinic decree disqualifying the offering when some of its blood is left over until the next day due to the concern that a priest may intend to leave over all of its blood, and if one’s intention is to leave all of its blood until the next day, the offering is rendered unfit by Torah law.

דתניא אמר להם רבי יהודה אי אתם מודים לי שאם הניחו למחר שפסול חישב להניחו למחר נמי פסול

As it is taught in a baraita: Rabbi Yehuda said to the Rabbis: Do you not concede to me that if he left the blood until the next day without presenting it, that the offering is unfit? Therefore, if he intended to leave the blood until the next day, it is also unfit.

ואתא ר' אלעזר למימר אף בזו ר' אליעזר פוסל וחכמים מכשירין

And Rabbi Elazar comes to say that even in this case Rabbi Eliezer deems the offering unfit and the Rabbis deem it fit, as there is no distinction between a case where one intended to drink of the blood on the next day and where one intended to merely leave the blood until the next day.

וסבר ר' יהודה להניח מדמו למחר דברי הכל פסול והתניא אמר רבי כשהלכתי למצות מדותי אצל ר' אלעזר בן שמוע ואמרי לה למצות מדותיו של ר' אלעזר בן שמוע מצאתי יוסף הבבלי יושב לפניו והיה חביב לו ביותר עד לאחת אמר לו רבי השוחט את הזבח להניח מדמו למחר מהו

The Gemara asks: And does Rabbi Yehuda in fact hold that if one’s intention is to leave some of the blood until the next day, everyone agrees that the offering is unfit? But isn’t it taught in a baraita: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi said: When I went to Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua to clarify my knowledge, and some say that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi said: When I went to clarify the knowledge of, i.e., study under, Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua, I found Yosef the Babylonian sitting before Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua. And every ruling that Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua taught was especially dear to him, until they began discussing one halakha, when Yosef the Babylonian said to him: My teacher, with regard to one who slaughters the offering with the intention to leave some of its blood for the next day, what is the halakha?

אמר לו כשר ערבית אמר לו כשר שחרית אמר לו כשר צהרים אמר לו כשר מנחה אמר לו כשר אלא שר' אליעזר פוסל צהבו פניו של יוסף הבבליא

Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him: The offering is fit. Yosef the Babylonian repeated this question that evening, and Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him that the offering is fit. He asked again the following morning, and Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him that the offering is fit. Once again, he asked this question at noon, and Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him that the offering is fit. When he asked the question a further time that late afternoon, Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him: I hold that the offering is fit, but Rabbi Eliezer deems it unfit. Yosef the Babylonian’s face lit up [tzahavu panav] with joy.

אמר לו יוסף כמדומה אני שלא כיווננו שמועתינו עד עתה אמר לו רבי הן אלא שר' יהודה פסול שנה לי וחזרתי על כל תלמידיו ובקשתי לי חבר ולא מצאתי עכשיו ששנית לי פסול החזרת לי אבידתי

Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua said to him: Yosef, it seems to me that our, i.e., my, halakhot were not accurate until now, when I said that the offering is fit. Yosef the Babylonian said to him: My teacher, yes, I agree that the offering is fit, as you said. But my reluctance to accept your statement was due to the fact that Rabbi Yehuda taught me that the offering is unfit, and I went around to all of Rabbi Yehuda’s disciples, seeking another disciple who had also heard this from him, but I could not find one, and thought that I must have been mistaken. Now that you have taught me that Rabbi Eliezer deems it unfit, you have returned to me that which I had lost.

זלגו עיניו דמעות של רבי אלעזר בן שמוע אמר אשריכם תלמידי חכמים שדברי תורה חביבין עליכם ביותר קרא עליו המקרא הזה (תהלים קיט, צז) מה אהבתי תורתך כל היום היא שיחתי וגו' הא מפני שר' יהודה בנו של ר' אלעאי ורבי אלעאי תלמידו של ר' אליעזר לפיכך שנה לך משנת רבי אליעזר

The baraita continues: Upon hearing this, Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua’s eyes streamed with tears, and he said: Happy are you, Torah scholars, for whom matters of Torah are exceedingly dear. Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua recited this verse about Yosef the Babylonian: “O how I love Your Torah; it is my meditation all the day” (Psalms 119:97). He continued: Because Rabbi Yehuda is the son of Rabbi Elai, and Rabbi Elai is the student of Rabbi Eliezer, therefore Rabbi Yehuda taught you the mishna of Rabbi Eliezer that the offering is unfit.

ואי סלקא דעתך דברי הכל פסול אתנייה מאי החזרת לי אבידתי איהו פלוגתא קאמר ליה

The Gemara explains its objection: And if it enters your mind that Rabbi Yehuda taught Yosef the Babylonian that all agree that the offering is unfit, what did Yosef the Babylonian mean when he said to Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua: You have returned to me that which I had lost? Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua had said to him only that whether the offering is rendered unfit is subject to a dispute, and Yosef the Babylonian would have been taught that all agree that it is unfit.

אלא מאי כשר ור' אליעזר פסול פוסל אתנייה אי הכי מאי הא מפני (פלוגתא) אנן נמי פלוגתא קא מתנינן

Rather, what is it that Rabbi Yehuda taught Yosef the Babylonian? Did he teach him that the Rabbis deem the offering fit and Rabbi Eliezer deems it unfit? If that is so, what did Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua mean when he said that it was only because Rabbi Yehuda was the son of Rabbi Elai, who was the student of Rabbi Eliezer, that Rabbi Yehuda taught this dispute? According to Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua, we too teach this dispute. The fact that Rabbi Yehuda taught both opinions in a dispute does not require justification.

אלא לעולם דברי הכל פסול אתנייה ומאי החזרת לי אבידתי דהדר ליה מיהא שום פסלות בעולם:

Rather, it must be that actually, Rabbi Yehuda taught Yosef the Babylonian that all agree that the offering is unfit; and what did Yosef the Babylonian mean when he said: You have returned to me that which I had lost? He meant that Rabbi Elazar ben Shammua had in any event returned to him that there is some opinion in the world concerning the unfitness of the offering if one’s intention was to leave over the blood until the next day. His answer reassured Yosef the Babylonian that there is in fact such an opinion.

מתני׳ לא יצק לא בלל ולא פתת ולא מלח ולא הניף לא הגיש או שפתתן פתים מרובות ולא משחן כשירה:

MISHNA: If one did not pour the oil onto the meal offering, or did not mix the oil into the meal offering, or did not break the loaves into pieces, or did not add salt, or did not wave the omer meal offering or the meal offering of a sota, or did not bring the meal offering to the altar, or if it happened that the priest broke the meal offerings that require breaking into greater pieces than appropriate, or did not smear oil on the wafers requiring this (see Leviticus 2:4), in all these cases the meal offering is fit.

גמ׳ מאי לא יצק אילימא לא יצק כלל עיכובא כתב בה אלא לא יצק כהן אלא זר אי הכי לא בלל נמי לא בלל כהן אלא זר הא לא בלל כלל פסולה

GEMARA: The Gemara asks: What does the mishna mean when it states that if one did not pour the oil onto the meal offering, the meal offering is fit? If we say that it means that he did not pour oil at all, that is difficult: Doesn’t the verse write with regard to the pouring of the oil that doing so is indispensable? Rather, the mishna must be referring to a case where a priest did not pour the oil onto the meal offering, but a non-priest did pour it. The Gemara notes: If so, that the first clause of the mishna is understood in this manner, then the next halakha in the mishna: If one did not mix the oil into the meal offering, should also be understood as referring to a case where a priest did not mix the oil into the meal offering, but a non-priest did mix it, so it is fit. This would indicate that if one did not mix the oil into the meal offering at all, the meal offering is unfit.