Chullin 59bחולין נ״ט ב
The William Davidson Talmudתלמוד מהדורת ויליאם דוידסון
Save 'Chullin 59b'
Toggle Reader Menu Display Settings
59bנ״ט ב

להתיר חלבה והכי קאמר אלו הן סימני חיה שחלבה מותר כל שיש לה קרנים וטלפים

The signs are given to permit its forbidden fat, i.e., to deem the animal undomesticated. Fat that is forbidden for consumption in domesticated animals is permitted in undomesticated animals. And this is what the tanna is saying: These are the signs of a kosher undomesticated animal, so that one will know that its fat is permitted: Any animal that has horns and cloven hooves is an undomesticated animal.

רבי דוסא אומר יש לה קרנים אי אתה צריך לחזור על טלפים יש לה טלפים צריך אתה לחזור על קרנים וקרש אע"פ שאין לו אלא קרן אחת מותר

Rabbi Dosa says: If it has horns, it is certainly a kosher undomesticated animal, and you need not search for cloven hooves. But if it has cloven hooves, you must still search for horns. And with regard to the animal called a keresh, even though it has only one horn, its fat is permitted for consumption.

כללא הוא והרי עז דיש לו קרנים וטלפים וחלבו אסור כרוכות בעינן והרי שור דכרוכות וחלבו אסור חרוקות בעינן

The Gemara asks: Is this an established principle? But isn’t there a goat, which has horns and cloven hooves, and still its fat is forbidden, as it is a domesticated animal? The Gemara responds: We require horns that are layered to designate a kosher animal as undomesticated; a goat’s horns are not layered. The Gemara asks: But isn’t there a bull, which has layered horns, and still its fat is forbidden since it is domesticated? The Gemara responds: We require horns that are grooved; a bull’s horns are not grooved.

והרי עז דחרוקות וחלבו אסור מפוצלות בעינן והרי צבי דאין מפוצלות וחלבו מותר חדורות בעינן

The Gemara persists: But isn’t there a goat, which has grooved horns, and still its fat is forbidden? The Gemara responds: We require horns that are branched; a goat’s horns are not branched. The Gemara asks: But isn’t there a gazelle [tzevi], whose horns are not branched, and still its fat is permitted? The Gemara responds: We require horns that are rounded and not broad like those of a sheep.

הלכך היכא דמיפצלא לא דינא ולא דיינא היכא דלא מיפצלא בעינן כרוכות חדורות וחרוקות והוא דמיבלע חירקייהו

The Gemara concludes: Therefore, where an animal’s horns are branched, there is neither judgment nor judge, and the animal is without a doubt undomesticated. Where they are not branched, we require that they be layered, rounded, and grooved. And it must be grooved in a pattern such that its grooves are absorbed into one another.

והיינו ספיקא דעיזא כרכוז ההיא עיזא כרכוז דהואי בי ריש גלותא דעקור מלא צנא דתרבא מינה רב אחאי אסר רב שמואל בריה דרבי אבהו אכל מיניה קרי אנפשיה (משלי יח, כ) מפרי פי איש תשבע בטנו

And this is the uncertainty that arose concerning the karkoz goat, i.e., whether it is considered a domesticated animal. As there was a certain karkoz goat that was in the house of the Exilarch, from which they removed a full basket of fat after slaughtering it. Rav Aḥai deemed the fat forbidden, because he considered it a domesticated animal. But Rav Shmuel, son of Rabbi Abbahu, ate of it. He read the verse about himself: “A man’s belly shall be filled with the fruit of his mouth” (Proverbs 18:20). In other words, due to his learning, he knew it was permitted to eat the fat of the karkoz goat.

שלחו מתם הלכתא כוותיה דשמואל בריה דרבי אבהו והזהרו ברבינו אחאי שמאיר עיני גולה הוא:

The Sages sent a message from there, Eretz Yisrael: The halakha is in accordance with the opinion of Rav Shmuel, son of Rabbi Abbahu, that a karkoz goat is an undomesticated animal and its fat is permitted; but nevertheless, be mindful of the honor of our teacher Aḥai who deems it forbidden, and do not partake of the fat in his presence, as he enlightens the eyes of the exile.

וקרש אע"פ שאין לו אלא קרן אחת מותר: אמר רב יהודה קרש טביא דבי עילאי טגרס אריא דבי עילאי אמר רב כהנא תשע אמהתא הוי בין אונא לאונא דאריא דבי עילאי אמר רב יוסף שיתסר אמהתא הוי משכיה דטביא דבי עילאי

§ The baraita states: And with regard to the animal called a keresh, even though it has only one horn, its fat is permitted for consumption. Rav Yehuda says: The keresh is the gazelle that is native to the area of Bei Ila’ei. The tagras mentioned by the Sages is the lion of Bei Ila’ei. Rav Kahana says: There are nine cubits between the ears of the lion of Bei Ila’ei. Rav Yosef says: The length of the gazelle of Bei Ila’ei is sixteen cubits.

אמר ליה קיסר לר' יהושע בן חנניה אלהיכם כאריה מתיל דכתיב (עמוס ג, ח) אריה שאג מי לא יירא מאי רבותיה פרשא קטיל אריא אמר ליה לאו כהאי אריא מתיל כאריא דבי עילאי מתיל אמר ליה בעינא דמיחזית ליה ניהלי אמר ליה לא מצית חזית ליה אמר ליה איברא חזינא ליה בעא רחמי אתעקר מדוכתיה

The Gemara recounts: The Roman emperor said to Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥananya: Your God is compared to a lion, as it is written: “The lion has roared, who will not fear” (Amos 3:8). But if so, what is His greatness? A cavalryman can kill a lion. Rabbi Yehoshua said to him: God is not compared to that lion which a cavalryman can kill. Rather, God is compared to the lion of Bei Ila’ei. The emperor said to him: I ask that you show it to me. Rabbi Yehoshua said to him: You cannot see it. The emperor said to him: Truly, I wish to see it. Rabbi Yehoshua prayed for mercy, and the lion of Bei Ila’ei set off from its place of origin toward Rome.

כי הוה מרחיק ארבע מאה פרסי ניהם חד קלא אפילו כל מעברתא ושורא דרומי נפל אדמרחק תלת מאה פרסי ניהם קלא אחרינא נתור ככי ושיני דגברי ואף הוא נפל מכורסייא לארעא א"ל במטותא מינך בעי רחמי עליה דלהדר לדוכתיה בעא רחמי עליה ואהדר ליה לאתריה

When it was four hundred parasangs away from Rome, it roared once, and all the pregnant women miscarried, and the wall of Rome fell. When it was three hundred parasangs away, it roared another time, and all the men’s front and back teeth fell out from fear. And even he, the emperor, fell from his throne to the ground. The emperor said to Rabbi Yehoshua: I beg you, pray for mercy with regard to it, that it should go back to the place from which it came. Rabbi Yehoshua prayed for mercy with regard to it, and it returned to the place from which it came.

אמר ליה קיסר לר' יהושע בן חנניה בעינא דאיחזי לאלהיכו א"ל לא מצית חזית ליה א"ל איברא

§ The Gemara recounts: The emperor said to Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥananya: I wish to see your God. Rabbi Yehoshua said to him: You cannot see Him. The emperor said to him: Truly,