Sotah 19aסוטה י״ט א
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19aי״ט א

דכתיב זאת בשני אנשים ושני בועלין דכולי עלמא לא פליגי דהאשה שותה ושונה דכתיב תורת

as it is written: “This is the law of jealousy.” The word “this” is a restricting term and excludes that possibility. With regard to two different husbands and two different paramours, where her first husband suspected her with regard to one paramour during her first marriage and the second husband suspected her with regard to a different man during the second marriage, everyone agrees that the woman drinks and repeats, as it is written: “This is the law of jealousy,” in all cases of jealousy.

כי פליגי באיש אחד ושני בועלין בשני אנשים ובועל אחד

They disagree when there is one husband and two paramours, i.e., where one husband warned her with regard to a second paramour after she survived her first ordeal. They also disagree in a case of two husbands and one paramour, i.e., if her second husband accused her with regard to the same paramour on account of whom she was compelled to drink by her first husband.

ת"ק סבר תורת לרבויי כולהי זאת למעוטי איש אחד ובועל אחד

The opinions are justified as follows: The first tanna holds that the phrase “the law of jealousy” serves to include all of these cases. In almost all cases the woman drinks and repeats. The word “this” serves to exclude only the case of one husband and one paramour, in which she does not drink and repeat.

ורבנן בתראי סברי זאת למעוטי כולהי תורת לרבויי שני אנשים ושני בועלין

And the Rabbis mentioned later in the baraita hold that the word “this” serves to exclude all of these cases. The woman almost never drinks and repeats. The phrase “the law of jealousy” serves to include only the case of two husbands and two paramours, in which she does drink and repeat.

ור' יהודה זאת למעוטי תרתי תורת לרבות תרתי זאת למעוטי תרתי איש אחד ובועל אחד איש אחד ושני בועלין תורת לרבויי תרתי שני אנשים ובועל אחד שני אנשים ושני בועלין

And Rabbi Yehuda holds: The word “this” serves to exclude two of the cases, and the phrase “the law of jealousy” serves to include two. The word “this” serves to exclude the two cases of one husband and one paramour and one husband and two paramours. In neither of these cases does the woman drink and repeat. The phrase “the law of jealousy” serves to include two cases, i.e., two husbands and one paramour, and all the more so two husbands and two paramours. In both of these cases, the woman must drink and repeat.



הדרן עלך היה מביא

מתני׳ היה נוטל את מנחתה מתוך כפיפה מצרית ונותנה לתוך כלי שרת ונותנה על ידה וכהן מניח ידו מתחתיה ומניפה הניף והגיש קמץ והקטיר והשאר נאכל לכהנים

MISHNA: He would take her meal-offering out of the Egyptian wicker basket made of palm leaves in which it was lying and would put it into a service vessel and then place it on her hand. And the priest would then place his hand underneath hers and wave it together with her. The priest waved it and brought it near to the southwest corner of the altar, removed a handful from it, and burned the handful; and the remainder was eaten by the priests.

היה משקה ואחר כך מקריב את מנחתה רבי שמעון אומר מקריב את מנחתה ואח"כ היה משקה שנאמר (במדבר ה, כו) ואחר ישקה את האשה את המים אם השקה ואחר כך הקריב את מנחתה כשרה

The priest would force the woman to drink the bitter water of a sota, and afterward he would sacrifice her meal-offering. Rabbi Shimon says: The priest would sacrifice her meal-offering and afterward he would force her to drink, as it is stated: “And the priest shall take a handful of the meal-offering, as the memorial part of it, and burn it upon the altar, and afterward he shall make the woman drink the water” (Numbers 5:26). But Rabbi Shimon concedes that if the priest first forced her to drink and afterward sacrificed her meal-offering, it is still valid.

גמ׳ אמר ליה רבי אלעזר לרבי יאשיה דדריה לא תיתב אכרעך עד דמפרשת לה להא מילתא מנין למנחת סוטה שטעונה תנופה מנא לן והניף כתיב בה בבעלים מנלן

GEMARA: Rabbi Elazar said to Rabbi Yoshiya of his generation, i.e., his contemporary: You shall not sit on your feet until you explain this matter to me: From where is it derived that the meal-offering of a sota requires waving? The Gemara expresses surprise at the question: From where do we derive this? It is explicitly written with regard to the meal-offering of a sota: “And the priest shall take the meal-offering of jealousy out of the woman’s hand, and shall wave the meal-offering before the Lord, and bring it unto the altar” (Numbers 5:25). Rather, the question is as follows: From where do we derive that the waving is performed by the owner, i.e., the woman, and not only by the priest?

אתיא יד יד משלמים כתיב הכא (במדבר ה, כה) ולקח הכהן מיד האשה וכתיב התם (ויקרא ז, ל) ידיו תביאנה

Rabbi Yoshiya answered: This is derived by means of a verbal analogy between the term “hand” written here and “hand” from the peace-offering: It is written here, with regard to the meal-offering of a sota: “And the priest shall take the meal-offering of jealousy out of the woman’s hand” (Numbers 5:25), and it is written there, with regard to the peace-offering: “He that offers his peace-offerings unto the Lord…His own hands shall bring the offerings…that the breast may be waved before the Lord” (Leviticus 7:29–30).

מה כאן כהן אף להלן כהן ומה להלן בעלים אף כאן בעלים הא כיצד מניח ידו תחת ידי הבעלים ומניף

Just as here, in the case of the sota, the priest waves the offering, so too there, in the case of the peace-offering, the priest waves the offering. And just as there, in the case of the peace-offering, the owner waves the offering, so too here, in the case of the sota, the owner waves the offering. How is this accomplished? The priest places his hand beneath the hands of the owner and then waves the offering with the owner.

הניף והגיש קמץ וכו' היה משקה ואחר כך מקריב את מנחתה הא אקרבה

§ The mishna states: The priest waved it and brought it near to the southwest corner of the altar, removed a handful from it, and burned the handful. Yet the continuation of the mishna states: The priest would force the woman to drink, and afterward he would sacrifice her meal-offering. The Gemara asks: Didn’t the mishna state in the previous phrase that the offering was already sacrificed?

הכי קאמר סדר מנחות כיצד הניף והגיש קמץ והקטיר והשאר נאכל לכהנים

The Gemara answers: This is what the mishna is saying: What was the sacrificial order of meal-offerings in general? The priest waved the meal-offering and brought it near to the southwest corner of the altar, removed a handful from it, and burned the handful, and the remainder was eaten by the priests.

ובהשקאה גופה פליגי רבי שמעון ורבנן דרבנן סברי משקה ואח"כ מקריב את מנחתה ורבי שמעון סבר מקריב את מנחתה ואחר כך משקה שנאמר (במדבר ה, כו) ואחר ישקה

And as for the correct order for sacrificing the meal-offering of the sota and forcing her to drink, this itself is a matter about which Rabbi Shimon and the Rabbis disagree, as the Rabbis hold that the priest would force the woman to drink and afterward he would sacrifice her meal-offering; and Rabbi Shimon holds that the priest would sacrifice her meal-offering and afterward he would force her to drink, as it is stated: “And the priest shall take a handful of the meal-offering, as the memorial part of it, and burn it upon the altar, and afterward he shall make the woman drink the water” (Numbers 5:26).

ואם השקה ואחר כך הקריב את מנחתה כשרה

§ The mishna states: But Rabbi Shimon concedes that if the priest first forced her to drink and afterward sacrificed her meal-offering, the offering is still valid.