Arakhin 12b:2ערכין י״ב ב:ב
The William Davidson Talmudתלמוד מהדורת ויליאם דוידסון
Save "Arakhin 12b:2"
Toggle Reader Menu Display Settings
12bי״ב ב

שניה עלה וכיבש יהויקים:

in his second year he ascended to Eretz Yisrael and conquered Jehoiakim.

וכן בשניה

§ The Gemara continues its discussion of the baraita, which teaches: When the Temple was destroyed for the first time, that day was the Ninth of Av; and it was the conclusion of Shabbat; and it was the year after a Sabbatical Year; and likewise, the same happened when the Second Temple was destroyed.

ושניה במוצאי שביעית מי משכחת לה מכדי בית שני כמה קם ארבע מאה ועשרים ארבע מאה תמניא יובלי ארבסרי תרי שבוע פשו להו שית הוה ליה בשיתא בשבוע

The Gemara asks: Can you find such a possibility, that the Second Temple was destroyed in the year after a Sabbatical Year? Now, for how many years did the Second Temple stand? It stood for 420 years. Four hundred years include exactly eight Jubilees, as the Jubilee cycle is fifty years. An additional fourteen years consist of two Sabbatical cycles. There are six years remaining during which the Temple stood, which means that the last year was the sixth year of the Sabbatical cycle, and therefore when the Temple was destroyed the following year it was a Sabbatical Year, not the year after the Sabbatical Year.

הא מני רבי יהודה היא דאמר שנת חמשים עולה לכאן ולכאן אייתי תמניא מתמניא יובלי והני שית הוי ארביסר אישתכח דבמוצאי שביעית חרוב

The Gemara answers: In accordance with whose opinion is this baraita stated? It is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda, who says that the fiftieth year is counted for here and for there, i.e., it is both the Jubilee Year and the first year of the next Sabbatical cycle and Jubilee cycle, and therefore each Jubilee cycle is only forty-nine years rather than fifty years. Consequently, when calculating the number of years of the Sabbatical and Jubilee cycles until the destruction of the Second Temple, bring an additional eight years from the eight complete Jubilee cycles during which the Temple stood. The eight years and those six years that remained according to the previous calculation equal fourteen years, which are two complete Sabbatical cycles. Therefore, it is found that the Second Temple was destroyed in the year following the Sabbatical Year.

אי ר' יהודה בראשונה לא משכחת לה דתניא שבעה עשר יובלות מנו ישראל משנכנסו לארץ ועד שיצאו ואי אתה יכול לומר משעה שנכנסו מנו שאם אתה אומר כן נמצא בית חרב בתחילת יובל ואי אתה מוצא (יחזקאל מ, א) בארבע עשרה שנה אחר אשר הוכתה העיר

The Gemara objects: But if one explains the baraita in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda, the first clause of the baraita is problematic, as you do not find that the first time the Temple was destroyed was in the year after the Sabbatical Year. As it is taught in a baraita: The Jewish people counted seventeen Jubilees from when they entered Eretz Yisrael until they left, when the First Temple was destroyed. And you cannot say that they counted from the time they entered, because if you say this, the result is that the Temple was destroyed at the beginning of the Jubilee cycle, and you do not find that the Jubilee Year was “in the fourteenth year after the city was smitten” (Ezekiel 40:1).

אלא צא מהם שבע שכיבשו ושבע שחילקו ואתה מוצא (יחזקאל מ, א) בארבע עשרה שנה אחר אשר הוכתה העיר

Rather, remove from them the seven years when they conquered the land and the seven years when they divided the land, as they did not start counting the first Jubilee cycle until after those events. And you then find that the Jubilee Year was “in the fourteenth year after the city was smitten.”

ואי רבי יהודה אייתי שבסרי משבסרי יובלי שדי אהני הוה ליה בתלתא בשבוע

The Gemara explains the difficulty from this baraita: But if one holds in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda, that each Jubilee cycle is forty-nine years rather than fifty years, you must bring an additional seventeen years, one from each of the seventeen Jubilee cycles and add them to these seventeen cycles, and it turns out that the destruction of the Temple was in the third year of the Sabbatical cycle.

הנך שני דאגלינהו סנחריב עד דאתא ירמיה אהדרינהו לא קחשיב להו

The Gemara answers: Throughout those years from when Sennacherib exiled the ten tribes until Jeremiah came and returned them to their land, they did not count the Jubilee cycle, as the Jubilee applies only when all twelve tribes are in their ancestral lands. When the exiles returned, a new Jubilee cycle was started, and the Temple was destroyed thirty-six years later, in the year after a Sabbatical Year.

איבעית אימא לעולם רבנן וכי קתני וכן בשניה אשארא

The Gemara suggests a second answer to its question about the statement of the baraita which equates the destructions of the First Temple and the Second Temple. And if you wish, say instead: Actually, the baraita is in accordance with the opinion of the Rabbis, and when it teaches: And likewise, the same happened when the Second Temple was destroyed, it is not asserting that the Temple was destroyed in a year after a Sabbatical Year, because in fact the Second Temple was destroyed during a Sabbatical Year. Rather, it is referring to the other details the baraita provides with regard to the timing of the destruction, i.e., that it occurred on the Ninth of Av and on a Sunday.

הכי נמי מסתברא דאי לא תימא הכי משמרתו של יהויריב בשניה מי הואי

The Gemara comments: So too, it is reasonable to conclude that not all of the details pertaining to the destruction of the First Temple also apply to the destruction of the Second Temple. As, if you do not say so, then with regard to the statement that the destruction occurred during the week of the priestly watch of Jehoiarib, was the priestly watch of Jehoiarib present during the time of the Second Temple?

והתניא ארבע משמרות עלו מן הגולה ידעיה וחרים פשחור ואימר עמדו נביאים שביניהם וחלקום לכ"ד משמרות בללום ונתנום בקלפי בא ידעיה ונטל חלקו וחלק חביריו שש

But isn’t it taught in a baraita that the watch of Jehoiarib did not exist during the Second Temple era? As it is taught: Only four priestly watches ascended from the Babylonian exile, while the other twenty stayed in Babylonia. And these are the watches who returned: The descendants of Jedaiah, Harim, Pashḥur, and Immer. The prophets among those who returned arose and divided these four families into twenty-four watches. They achieved this as follows: They wrote the names of these new twenty-four watches on pieces of paper, mixed them up, and put them in a receptacle [kalpi] from which lots were drawn. A representative from the family of Jedaiah came and drew his portion and the lot of five other watches, for a total of six.